Hesperus is Bosphorus

A group blog by philosophers in and from Turkey

Archive for the ‘Kant’ Category

Two talks on Political Philosophy by David Owen (Southampton) at Boğaziçi on 19th and 20th of April, 2018

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“Conflict and Norms in Kant and Nietzsche: Freedom as Independence, Self-Love, and the Rivalrous Emotions”

Thursday, April 19th, 5pm-7pm, JF507

Abstract: In Daybreak Nietzsche presents his project of re-evaluation as, in part, oriented to the following task: ‘we shall restore to men their goodwill towards the actions decried as egoistic and restore to these actions their value – we shall deprive them of their bad conscience!’ (D s.148) Why is the distinction between ‘egoistic’ and ‘unegoistic’ significant for Nietzsche? In this paper, I address this question by considering Kant’s and Nietzsche’s contrasting views concerning freedom, conflict and the rivalrous emotions. The central claim advanced is that Nietzsche’s concern with restoring goodwill towards, and the value of, (a range of) egoistic actions is motivated, first, by a revaluation of the ethical value of self-love as orientation of the self to what is noble (i.e., as non-instrumental rather than instrumental value) and second by the view that competition between persons to cultivate their relevant excellences of character is integral to securing the practical relation to self constitutive of autonomous agency and hence that rivalrous emotional responses to others may be expressions of virtue. A Kantian legal order of non-domination may, on this account, be decadent in a way that Kantian morality exacerbates.

“Refugees and responsibilities of justice”

Friday, April 20th, 5-7pm, JF507

Abstract: This essay develops an account of the shared responsibility of states to refugees and of how the character of that responsibility effects the ways in which it can be fairly shared. However, it moves beyond the question of the general obligations that states owe to refugees to consider ways in which refugee choices and refugee voice can be given appropriate standing with the global governance of refuge. It offers an argument for the normative significance of refugee’s reasons for choosing states of asylum and linked this to consideration of a refugee matching system and to refugee quota trading conceived as responsibility-trading, before turning to the issue of the inclusion of refugee voice in relation to the justification of the norms of refugee governance and in relation to the institutions and practices of refugee governance through which those norms are given practical expression.

 

David Owen is Professor of Social and Political Philosophy at the University of Southampton. He has published widely across three main research areas: Nietzsche and post-Kantian critical theory encompassing post-structuralism and the Frankfurt School); Problems of Political Community addressing issues of multiculturalism and migration; and Democratic Theory ranging from foundational to policy-relevant levels of analysis. His current research projects address the structure of agonist political theory and its relationship to perfectionism and realism, and the ethics and politics of migration and transnational citizenship. His most recent books are Nietzsche’s Genealogy of Morality (Acumen, 2007) and two co-edited volumes Multiculturalism and Political Theory (Cambridge University Press 2007) and Recognition and Power (Cambridge University Press, 2007). He is co-editor of the Critical Powers book series for Bloomsbury Academic and of Citizenship Transitions for Palgrave Macmillan, and Book Reviews Editor for the journal Political Theory. He also serves on the editorial boards of Journal of Nietzsche Studies, Max Weber Studies and Political Studies Review. In recent years he has been Visiting Professor of Politics (2008) and of Philosophy (2010) at the Goethe University, Frankfurt.

 

The talks are organized a part of the joint Boğaziçi -Southampton Newton-Katip Çelebi project AF140071 “Agency and Autonomy: Kant and the Normative Foundations of Republican Self-Government” run by Lucas Thorpe (Boğaziçi) and Andrew Stephenson (Southampton).

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Written by Lucas Thorpe

March 21, 2018 at 6:32 pm

Talk at BETİM: Kant’s Anthropology – by Marc Rölli (Zürich), Thu. 28 May 2015

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Kant’s Anthropology: Between Universalism and Inegalitarianism

Prof. Dr. Marc Rölli, Zürich (Switzerland)

Thu. 28 May 2015, 5.15 – 7.15 pm

(Talk in English)

Dr. Rölli Tr-En Çal  tay Afi i

Click on poster to enlarge

All welcome, registration not required.

for directions see

http://www.betim.org.tr/index.php/iletisim.html

Betimsade

Written by rainerbroemer

May 21, 2015 at 4:10 pm

Posted in Ethics, Kant

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Kant Reading Group at Bogazici (Spring 2015, Thursdays, 5.15-7pm)

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We will be continuing with our Kant reading group at Bogazici this semester. We will meet in TB365 on Thursdays, 5.15-7pm.

We will start this Thursday (12/02/2015) by looking at Kant’s essay “On the Common Saying: that may be true in theory, but is no use in practice”. A copy of the essay can be found here.

During the first meeting we will decide what to read for the rest of the semester.

If you would like more information, or would like to be added to our mailing group, please email Melisa: melisakurtcan@gmail.com

Written by Lucas Thorpe

February 9, 2015 at 11:47 am

Posted in Kant

Professor Kenneth Westphal has joined the Bogazici University Philosophy Department.

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Professor Kenneth Westphal, the internationally renowned Kant and Hegel Scholar, has joined the Bogazici philosophy department as a full-time member.

Ken Wesphal is the author or editor of 8 books, including, as author:

(1)  Kant’s Transcendental Proof of Realism (Oxford University Press)

(2) Hegel’s Epistemology: A Philosophical Introduction to the Phenomenology of Spirit (Hackett)

(3) Hegel’s Epistemological Realism: A Study of the Aim and Method of Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit (Springer)

(4) Hegel, Hume und die Identitat wahrnehmbarer Dinge (Klostermann)

And as editor:

(1) The Blackwell Guide to Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit (Blackwell)

(2) Realism, Science, and Pragmatism (Routledge)

He has also published more than a 100 papers and articles.  Ken will be a valuable addition to the philosophy community in Turkey, and we welcome him to the department and to Turkey.

Kant Reading Group at Bogazici (Mondays, 5.15-7pm)

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Lucas Thorpe and Ken Westphal will be running a Kant Reading Group at Bogazici University that will meet every Monday from 5.15pm-7pm in TB365 (starting on Monday October 13th 2104).

We will start by reading the manuscript of Ken Westphal’s new book – Moral Constructivism: Hume’s and Kant’s Natural Law Constructivism.

Once we have finished this we will decide collectively what to read next. If you would like to join the reading group, be sent a copy of the manuscript, and be added to our mailing list, please email Zubeyde: zkaradag(at)gmail.com.

Everyone welcome.

 

Written by Lucas Thorpe

October 5, 2014 at 12:17 pm

CFA: “KANTIAN CONSTRUCTIVISM IN LEGAL PHILOSOPHY” (Glasgow, 3-6 September, 2014)

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Dr. Ruhi Demiray (Keele/Kocaeli) is organizing the following panel at the European Congress of Political Research in Glasgow in September, 2014, and asked me to advertise the following call for proposals.

CALL FOR PAPERS FOR THE ECPR GENERAL CONFERENCE PANEL “KANTIAN CONSTRUCTIVISM IN LEGAL PHILOSOPHY”

The ECPR General Conference that will take place at the University of Glasgow between 3-6 September 2014 will include a section on “Kant and Kantian Constructivism”. We are to convene a panel under this section with the title of “Kantian Constructivism in Legal Philosophy”, the topics of which is described below. We will welcome your paper proposals until 8 February 2014. Proposals should include an abstract (max. 150 words) and basic information about author(s). Please send your proposals to ruhidemiray@ymail.com or m.r.demiray@keele@ac.uk.

Description of the Topic:

Political and legal theory is divided by two competing approaches, namely, the family of positivist approaches based on moral scepticism or moral indifferentism, and the family of ethical approaches based on substantive normative values that their protagonists consider self-evident but others, controversial. Dissatisfaction with the guidance these approaches could provide in dealing with the political and legal problems of the societies of contemporary world is a major reason for the recently raising interest in Kantian Constructivism among political and legal theorists. For Kantian Constructivism promises to provide a normative account of our political and legal practices on the basis of ideas of Right and Public Reason without falling into the pitfalls that approaches appealing to substantive normative values are faced with. This panel is thus designed to discuss what insights Kantian Constructivism brings about with regard to various dimensions and instances of our political and legal practices, such as the legitimate scope of legal regulation, the nature of legal obligation, juridical review over legislation, the separation of powers, political rights, political participation, and voting.

Written by Lucas Thorpe

February 1, 2014 at 1:49 pm

Talk in Istanbul: Uygar Abaci (University of Richmond) on ‘Modality and Morality in Kant: A Theory of Practical Cognition’ 24/12/2013

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Uygar Abaci (University of Richmond) will give a talk at Istanbul Technical University, on Tuesday  December 24, 2013 at 13:30 in the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences.

ABSTRACT: In his preface to the Critique of Practical Reason, Kant defines “the enigma of the critical philosophy” in terms of the following conundrum: how can we, as epistemic subjects, retain a theoretical agnosticism with respect to the reality of objects such as freedom, God and the immortality of the soul that lie beyond the limits of our possible experience, and yet assert the reality of these objects “from a practical point of view”, that is, when it comes to considering ourselves as moral subjects (5:5). The solution to the enigma, I suggest, lies in the practical application of Kant’s critical conception of modality. According to this conception, modal concepts such as possibility, actuality and necessity signify the ways in which objects are related or given to the subject rather than the ways objects themselves are. In the Critique of Pure Reason, Kant insists that in the theoretical domain objects can only be given to us through a connection with sensible intuition, which makes it impossible for us to grant a real modal status to these supersensible objects and thus renders their concepts merely “problematic” ideas for theoretical reason. However, Kant’s account of moral action in the Critique of Practical Reason assumes that in the moral-practical domain objects are given to us through a connection with the moral law. I argue that it is this special relation that enables us to make modal assertions even of those objects that cannot be given to us in sensible intuition.

 

Written by Lucas Thorpe

December 23, 2013 at 4:08 am