Hesperus is Bosphorus

A group blog by philosophers in and from Turkey

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Sehir University Philosophy Talks 28 // Some Ethical and Philosophical Implications of Modern Genomics Studies

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Written by metindemirsehir

March 17, 2017 at 11:07 am

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Sehir University Philosophy Talks 27 The Aesthetics of Sublime/Patrick Roney (the talk is postponed to 23 December)

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“Whatever happened to the Aesthetics of the Sublime?”

 

ABSTRACT: There was a time when the question of art and its future was answered in a decisive way by the return to Kant’s aesthetics of the sublime. The name most associated with this trend was Jean-François Lyotard, and his concern with the sublime formed one of the most essential characteristics of what has been called, appropriately or not, the Postmodern. Since then however, Lyotard’s conception has been strongly criticized in a number of ways that have also been directed at the entire discourse of a postmodern aesthetics. Foremost among these critics have been Jacques Rancière, whose idea of an “aesthetic regime” of art reaffirms by contrast the continuing predominance of the beautiful as an inexhaustible horizon of possibility for our time. My presentation will address this reversal of trend away from the Postmodern and the aesthetics of the sublime by focusing on the two main protagonists in disagreement, Lyotard and Rancière. In doing so I will attempt to consider what is actually at stake in the aesthetics of the sublime, particularly in relation to the future of art.

 

 

 

 

Written by metindemirsehir

December 5, 2016 at 2:24 pm

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Sehir University Philosophy Talks, Talking About the Unknown God, Erman Gören,17 Nov. Thursday

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Talking about the unknown God

The Corpus Dionysiacum presents a hierarchical account of the universe, and a description of deifying union with the “God beyond being” as “unknowing” (agnôsia). Pseudo-Dionysius’ entire mystical theology narrates the self’s efforts to unite with the “God beyond being” as a perpetual process of affirming (kataphasis) and negating (apophasis) the divine names. His conviction is that only by contemplating and then “clearing away” (aphairesis) all of our concepts and categories we can clear a space for the divine to descend free of idolatrous accretions. The result of such agnôsia, however, is no mere “agnosticism” but rather the indwelling of the unknown God (agnōstos theos) as Christ, so the aspirant simultaneously “unknows” God and the self. The climax of the Dionysian method is not simply a negation of some concept about God, but the negation of the concept of negation itself. God is beyond all human words and concepts, including the utterance of denials and the idea of negation. Even the most sophisticated theological negations do not capture God. Beyond the last word is only silence.

Written by metindemirsehir

November 14, 2016 at 2:28 pm

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Sehir University Philosophy Talks 25 Is Medical Ethics a Branch of Philosophy? Rainer Brömer 08 Nov. 2016 Tuesday

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“Is Medical Ethics a Branch of Philosophy?”
Doç. Dr. Rainer Brömer, İÜ Istanbul Medical Faculty, Dept. for History of Medicine and Ethics
While contemporary medical practice increasingly engages with ethical issues based on a limited range of philosophical principles (notably those developed by Beauchamp and Childress since 1979), little attention is generally paid to the underlying philosophical debates, to the extent that Beauchamp and Childress’ “Principles of Biomedical Ethics” have become known as the “Georgetown Mantra” (after Tom Beauchamp’s academic affiliation), leading an uneasy (often unreflected) coexistence with a case-based (casuistic) approach to ethical reasoning. This talk offers some reflections on the complex relationship between biomedical ethics and its philosophical foundations.

Written by metindemirsehir

October 23, 2016 at 8:44 am

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Sehir University International Workshop Time, Eternity, Cosmology in Islam and Byzantium: Aristotelian Receptions—and Beyond

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Tuesday 24 May, 15.00-17.30


Time, Eternity, Cosmology in Islam and Byzantium: Aristotelian Receptionsand Beyond
An international workshop in Philosophy at Istanbul Şehir University
Convener: Sotiris Mitralexis

 
Speakers include:
 
İshak Arslan (Istanbul Şehir University)
Sotiris Mitralexis (Istanbul Şehir University & University of Winchester)
Dionysios Skliris (Université Paris IV—Sorbonne)
İbrahim Üçer (Istanbul Medeniyet University)
While both Medieval Islamic and Byzantine Christian philosophical conceptions of time have been studied to some extent, a comparative approach to the diverse notions of temporality that are to be traced within those broad traditions emerging in neighboring geographical areas of the globe has never been explicitly attempted. In this workshop, scholars focusing on the philosophical understanding of temporality that can be found in a variety of Medieval Islamic philosophers and thinkers—most notably Ibn Sina (Avicenna)—one the one hand and in Byzantine philosophy—most notably Maximus the Confessor—on the other will come together with the purpose of attempting a comparative approach. Our main focal point will consist in tracing the lines of Aristotelian philosophy’s reception in Islamic and Byzantine philosophical cosmology as far as questions on time and eternity are concerned, with the hope of unveiling philosophically fecund similarities and differences. Each speaker will make a 15-minutes presentation of his area of expertise, after which the main discussion will commence.

Written by metindemirsehir

May 18, 2016 at 5:19 pm

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Sehir University Philosophy Talks 24: Alberto Siani

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Europe and Philosophy. Hegelian Perspectives

13 May 2016, 15:00

The presentation begins by formulating and articulating the thesis that the appeal to philosophical foundation and argumentation strategies in the ethical-political realm constitutes a distinctive trait of the European identity.  The choice of philosophical strategies over what I call “positive” strategies (religious, nationalistic, mythological, etc.) is intimately intertwined with the idea that the freedom of the subject is the ultimate source of all normative claims (I). I then proceed to argue more in particular that the critical reconstruction, foundation and legitimation of the actuality of freedom in the ethical-political forms of modern Europe is one of the deepest motives of Hegel’s philosophy (II). Finally, I discuss five attractive features (III) and three problematic traits (IV) of the Hegelian philosophy with regard to the Europe-philosophy connection.

 

 

Written by metindemirsehir

May 10, 2016 at 1:11 am

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Şehir Uni Philosophy Talks 23: Truth and Rightness in Legal Reasoning Vihren Bouzov 02 May

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Abstract

The efficiency in court’s proceedings has procedural, moral (social) and economic dimensions.  Several competing “right” solutions can fight in a court game within a framework set up by rules of procedure. It is impermissible to go beyond its rules, they are enacted in texts of law (procedural aspect of efficiency). The moral aspect comes down to sharing the benefits of legal justice as specific rights and obligations. Very important is the economic aspect of the case connected to an individual and the social benefits and losses. It can be successfully analyzed by means of the decision-theoric methodology of Law and Economics School. Their approach must be complemented by a social explanatory theory of legal method of solving conflicts.

Written by metindemirsehir

May 1, 2016 at 9:50 am

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