Hesperus is Bosphorus

A group blog by philosophers in and from Turkey

Archive for March 2014

Talk at Bogazici: David Harvey (CUNY) on “The Contradictions of Capitalist Urbanization” 27/03/2014

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David Harvey

There is an article in Hurriyet about the talk here.

Written by Lucas Thorpe

March 23, 2014 at 8:41 pm

Talk at Yeditepe by Sinem Elkatip Hatipoğlu (Sehir) on “Consciousness and Misrepresentation” (21/03/2014)

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YEDITEPE UNIVERSITY COGNITIVE SCIENCE SEMINARS (SPRING 2014)

“Consciousness and Misrepresentation”

by Assist. Prof. Dr. Sinem Elkatip Hatipoğlu (Şehir University), on March 21, at 16.00, in Law Building Room 332.

Abstract: No one denies that we humans differ significantly from what one might call our cognitive relatives, i.e. complex machines such as robots or other forms of living beings. However what marks the difference is difficult to pin down. Consciousness has been taken to be one of the best candidates to account for this difference but an account of consciousness is just as difficult to give. In this talk I focus on one particular theory of consciousness, viz. the higher-order theory of consciousness and a troubling aspect of this theory. Higher-order theories assert that a mental state is conscious when there is a higher-order representation of that mental state. For instance the perception of a blue chair is conscious when there is a higher-order representation of the perception. But since representations are not infallible, higher-order theorists embrace the possibility of having a conscious perception of a blue chair where there is a perception of a red chair or even where there is no perception. The former is usually called a misrepresentation and the latter radical misrepresentation. Even though higher-order theories have many virtues, I suggest that the possibility of a radical misrepresentation undermines some of those virtues. As such either the possibility of a radical misrepresentation needs to be denied or the phenomenon of a radical misrepresentation needs to be understood in a different way.

Written by Lucas Thorpe

March 19, 2014 at 6:28 pm

Talk at Bogazici: Manuel Knoll (Bogazici) on Machiavelli’s Republicanism (18/03/2014)

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I’m teaching a class on Republicanism, Liberalism and Democracy this semester, and I have a few guest speakers coming to give talks after the class. This coming Tuesday (18/03/2014), from 5.15pm -7pm, in TB130, Manuel Knoll, will give a talk on:

Machiavelli’s Republicanism

Everyone is welcome.  A handout for the talk can be found here.

ABSTRACT: Niccolò Machiavelli is best known for being the author of the booklet (“opuscolo”) The Prince. However, that doesn’t make him a champion of a principality. Rather, in his major work Discorsi he defends a republican political order. The talk clarifies the relation of the two works and gives an introduction to the main features of Machiavelli’s republicanism.

Written by Lucas Thorpe

March 14, 2014 at 1:26 pm

CFP: Commentating as Philosophy and the Abrahamic Interpreter,s July 2-5, 2014, Istanbul

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***Call extended to March 14, 2014**

Commentating as Philosophy and the Abrahamic Interpreters

July 2-5, 2014, Istanbul

http://www.arxai.org

 “Commentating as Philosophy and the Abrahamic Interpreters” is a conference second in a trilogy, entitled, “The Abrahamic Trilogy”. The trilogy is about the development and reception of Greek philosophy in the Abrahamic traditions. While the first conference was about Proclus, and his influence, the present conference will focus on the form of philosophy that was dominant until the early modern period.

The Abrahamic religions have a set of revealed holy texts which are intended to reveal the nature of God, creation, man’s place in it and his true destiny. As such, believers or those entrusted to guide the believers can or ought to have recourse to these texts to explain the nature of things. The intellectual and moral life was framed in interaction with a text. Parallel to this, one can view a similar tendency with the philosophical movement known as middle Platonism: here, philosophy was done by turning to the texts of Plato and Aristotle and either making commentaries on them or employing their texts liberally in independent treatises. These two threads meet powerfully, for example, in the Jewish philosopher from Alexandria, Philo. What is unique about Philo is how he used the philosophical concepts and systems of Plato and, to a lesser extent, Aristotle, to explain the Torah. Augustine claimed only to understand the Bible after reading the works of the Platonists and whose Biblical commentaries dominated the Latin west. Ibn-Sina also wrote many commentaries on Aristotle and developed his own system in that dialogue. Thus, for 1600 years, whether by a pagan or Abrahamic philosopher, the dominant mode of philosophising was done by means of writing commentaries.

The conference will, thus, explore the development of the commentary tradition within the ancient pagan world and the influence of that Greek commentary among Jews, Christians and Muslims and will focus on what it means to philosophise in a necessary interaction with a set texts that marks it off from early modern philosophy.

Confirmed speakers:

Prof. Richard Sorabji, CBE, FBA, (Wolfson College, Oxford and Emeritus, King’s College, London) will give the key-note lecture. Prof. Zev Harvey (Emeritus Prof. at Hebrew University and Columbia University) will give the plenary lecture on Jewish account and Prof. Thomas Leinkauf (Westfälischen Wilhelms Universität Münster) on the Christian account and Asst. Prof. Olga Lizzini (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) the Islamic account.

Please submit an abstract of approximately 500 words by March 14, 2014 to  https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=cpai14 [You must create an account there to upload your paper.] Notification of acceptances will be rolling. For further questions, please contact David Butorac at davidbutorac<atgoeshere>arxai.org and Marie-Élise (Lise) Zovko at lisezovko<atgoeshere>gmail.com. Papers will be 20-25 minutes long, although there may be some flexibility given some merit. Please see the conference website: http://www.arxai.org

The conference will take place at Sismanoglu Megaro (Greek Consulate) and Halki Seminary, Halki Island / Heybeliada, Istanbul from July 2-5, 2014.

Co-organizers

Plato Society of Zagreb

Institute of Philosophy (Zagreb)

Confirmed Sponsors

The Onassis Foundation

The Consulate General of Greece in Istanbul

The Consulate General of Israel in Istanbul

Halki Seminary – Greek Ecumenical Patriarchate

Written by davidbutorac

March 11, 2014 at 12:24 pm

Philosophy Student Congress for the Marmara Region 14-15 March 2014

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https://www.facebook.com/events/605664342846109/

(detailed programme below)

 

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program ak

Written by rainerbroemer

March 9, 2014 at 4:08 pm

Early Career Scholars Conference in Philosophy of Psychiatry: Overcoming Mind-Brain Dualism in 21st Century Medicine

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21-22, November 2014

Center for Philosophy of Science, 817 Cathedral of Learning, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA USA 15260

Conference website: http://www.pitt.edu/~pittcntr/Events/All/Conferences/others/other_conf_2014-15/11-21-14_mindbrain/mindbrain-cfp.html

We invite the submission of extended abstracts by early career scholars (graduate students, post-docs, and untenured faculty) for individual paper presentations (limit 30 minutes). Submissions should include a 1,000 word abstract, a 1-2 page CV, and should be in .doc/.docx or .pdf format via email.Deadline: May 5, 2014

Notification By: July 7, 2014

Email submissions to: pittmindbrainmedicine14@gmail.com

For questions and comments, contact Serife Tekin, serife.tekin@daemen.edu

Summary: The goal of this conference is to address the crisis in psychiatric research and treatment by exploring the ways in which the mind-brain dualism can be overcome in contemporary psychiatry.

CFP:
Psychiatry’s aspirations as a branch of medicine are often in conflict with its aspirations as a branch of science. As a branch of medicine, it aims to clinically address the complaints of individuals with mental disorders, including the subjective, mental, and first- person aspects of psychopathology (such as feelings of worthlessness and hallucinations). As a branch of science, on the other hand, it targets the objective, embodied, and third-person correlates of mental distress (such as atypical brain mechanisms and behavioral anomalies). The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), the psychiatric taxonomy used in the US and increasingly around the world, has traditionally been employed to identify both the scientific and medical targets of psychiatry, as well as in the service of sociological, pedagogical, and forensic projects. In attempting to be everything for psychiatry, however, the manual has succeeded in fully pleasing no one. The virtually universal dissatisfaction with contemporary nosology has led to a tension between critics who argue the way forward is focusing on the needs of the clinic and those who believe psychiatry should work harder to resemble the sciences.

We believe that the resolution of this dilemma is hindered by a contemporary form of dualism, in which psychiatric disorders are seen as either disembodied problems in living or as subtypes of somatic disease. There is a tendency to perceive the etiology of psychiatric disorders as either brain-based (organic or biological), to be investigated by the biomedical sciences, or mind-based (functional or psychological), to be investigated by behavior-based schemas such as the DSM or patient-centered approaches that take a more holistic approach to disorder. There is also a tendency to divide psychiatric treatments into those that directly target the brain, e.g., antidepressants, and those that purportedly target the mind, e.g., cognitive behavior therapy, — often to the detriment of the latter. While significant work has been done to overcome the dualistic conception of persons in the contemporary philosophy of cognitive science and in the philosophy of neuroscience, the results of these debates have not been fully transferred to the domain of psychiatry.

The goal of this conference is to address the crisis in psychiatric research and treatment by exploring the ways in which the mind-brain dualism can be overcome in contemporary psychiatry through an integration of approaches from philosophy of mind, philosophy of science (including philosophy of cognitive science and neuroscience) and philosophy of medicine. One goal of such re-evaluation is to reconcile the claim that psychopathology needs to be scientific with the claim that it needs to keep the experience of the sufferer at its core.

Format of Conference: The conference will take place over two days. Eight papers by early career scholars (graduate students, postdocs, and untenured faculty) will be commented on by senior philosophers who have expertise in philosophy of science, philosophy of neuroscience, or philosophy of medicine.

By matching each junior presenter with a senior commentator, our aim is to give junior scholars an opportunity to receive thoughtful and targeted feedback on their work and to facilitate lively discussions. Further, this format will initiate junior-mentor relationships that will help strengthen the philosophy of psychiatry community.

Each presenter will be given 25 minutes for his or her paper, followed by 15 minutes for commentary and 15 minutes for discussion.

If you are a senior scholar and would like to participate in the conference as a speaker or commentator, please contact Serife Tekin, at serife.tekin@daemen.edu.

Organizing Committee: William Bechtel, Trey Boone, Mazviita Shirimuuta, Peter Machamer, Edouard Machery, Ken Schaffner, Kathryn Tabb, and Serife Tekin.

Keynote speakers:
Jennifer Radden, PhD (Professor Emerita of Philosophy, University of Massachusetts, Boston).
John Sadler, MD (Professor of Psychiatry and Clinical Services, University of Texas Southwestern).

Commentators:
Mazviita Chirimuuta (University of Pittsburgh)
Peter Machamer (University of Pittsburgh)
Edouard Machery (University of Pittsburgh)
Kenneth F. Schaffner (University of Pittsburgh)
Jacqueline Sullivan (Western University)
Jonathan Tsou (Iowa State University)

1st Int. Symposium on Brain and Cognitive Science

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When & Where: 20 April 2014, full day, Boğaziçi University

Link: http://cogsci.boun.edu.tr/isbcs/2014/

Submission Deadline: 8 March 2014

Description

Cognitive science is the interdisciplinary research field that seeks to understand the nature of the human mind, in all its implications. The International Symposium on Brain and Cognitive Science (ISBCS) invites research from all the fields that are connected to cognitive science. The individual disciplines include Artificial Intelligence, Linguistics, Anthropology, Psychology, Neuroscience, Philosophy, and Education. Each discipline brings a set of tools, perspectives, and questions to the table. However, the big picture of the human mind cannot emerge by studying this multi-layered problem with a single lens. Communication and collaboration are essential for the cognitive scientist. It is under these premises that we initiate ISBCS.

One mission of ISBCS is to be a premier academic meeting of the cognitive science community. Established jointly by Bogazici University, Middle East Technical University and Yeditepe University (i.e. by the three universities that offer cognitive science programs in Turkey), ISBCS is planned to be held annually to gather researchers and students from leading national and international centers working on all areas of cognitive science. Our aim is to establish a platform where students can learn about recent research in cognitive science, researchers can network and initiate collaborations, and the participants can receive valuable feedback on their work.

Keynotes:

Prof. Garrison W. Cottrell (UCSD)
Prof. Erol Basar (Istanbul Kültür University)

Committees

Organizing Committee:

Albert Ali Salah, Bogazici University
Cem Bozsahin, Middle East Technical University
Simay Ikier, Yeditepe University

Program Committee (only confirmed members listed here)

Ata Akin, Bilgi University
Varol Akman, Bilkent University
Ethem Alpaydin, Bogazici University
Sonia Amado, Ege University
Canan Aykut Bingöl, Yeditepe University
Haluk Bingöl, Bogazici University
Hüseyin Boyaci, Bilkent University
Resit Canbeyli, Bogazici University
Banu Cangöz, Hacettepe University
Kürsat Çagiltay, Middle East Technical University
Hilmi Demir, Bilkent University
Tamer Demiralp, Istanbul University
Ulas Basar Gezgin, Istanbul Gelişim University
Didem Gökçay, Middle East Technical University
Bülent Gözkan, Mimar Sinan Fine Arts University
Burak Güçlü, Bogazici University
Sami Gülgöz, Koç University
Hakan Gürvit, Istanbul University
Altay Güvenir, Bilkent University
Bipin Indurkhya, Jagiellonian University
Aylin Küntay, Koç University
Mine Nakipoglu, Bogazici University
Sumru Özsoy, Bogazici University
Işık Özge Öztürk, Princeton University
Ilhan Raman, Middlesex University
Cem Say, Bogazici University
Gün R. Semin, Utrecht University
Serkan Sener, Yeditepe University
Oguz Tanridag, Üsküdar University
Ali Tekcan, Bogazici University
Lucas Thorpe, Bogazici University
Aziz Zambak, Middle East Technical University
Deniz Zeyrek, Middle East Technical University

Written by albertalisalah

March 2, 2014 at 3:01 am