Hesperus is Bosphorus

A group blog by philosophers in and from Turkey

Archive for December 2012

Talk at Bogazici: Saniye Vatansever (UIC) on “KANT’S ACCOUNT OF THE HIGHEST GOOD: WHAT CAN WE HOPE FOR? AND WHO ARE “WE”?” (04/01/2013)

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Saniye Vatansever (UIC) will give a talk this Friday (04/01/2013) at Bogazici University in TB130 from 5-7pm on:

“KANT’S ACCOUNT OF THE HIGHEST GOOD:
WHAT CAN WE HOPE FOR? AND WHO ARE “WE”?”

ABSTRACT: In the second Critique Kant argues that for the Highest Good to be possible we need to postulate the existence of God and the immortality of the soul. There Kant implies that the Highest Good is attainable only in the noumenal world. In his later writings, however, he argues that the Highest Good is attainable in the phenomenal world through mere human agency. It seems that Kant has two different and competing conceptions of the Highest Good, namely a theological and a secular conception. In this paper, I argue against both the theological and the secular readings. Instead of focusing exclusively on either the early or the latter writings, I argue that we need to understand why Kant writes in different and seemingly incoherent ways about the Highest Good.

Written by Lucas Thorpe

December 31, 2012 at 4:05 pm

CFA: PLURALISM AND CONFLICT: DISTRIBUTIVE JUSTICE BEYOND RAWLS AND CONSENSUS – Fatih University, June 6-8th 2013

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PLURALISM AND CONFLICT: DISTRIBUTIVE JUSTICE BEYOND RAWLS AND CONSENSUS

June 6-8 2013

Convenors: Prof. Dr. Manuel Andreas Knoll (mknoll@fatih.edu.tr), Nurdane Şimşek, M.A. (nsimsek@fatih.edu.tr), Department of Philosophy, Fatih University  

Call for Abstracts

Following Rawls, the prevailing political thought aims at some form of consensus about justice. Rawls conceives of this as a consensus about an initial choice situation for principles of justice, as a rational consensus about which principles to choose, or as an “overlapping consensus”, which a pluralist society should reach with regard to the political conception of justice he proposes.

The idea of a consensus on justice was questionable from the beginning. For some theorists this was made evident through Robert Nozick’s strong disagreement with Rawls’s fundamental moral intuition that the inequalities of natural endowments are undeserved and call for social redress or compensation. Likewise, Rawls’s idea that individuals are equal as moral persons does not allow for a consensus. Going back to Aristotle, John Kekes argued that people who habitually harm others have a lower moral worth than people who habitually do good. In this case, isn’t Rawls’s rationalist creed that all persons should be convinced by the same arguments, and must therefore reach a rational consensus on principles of justice, highly questionable? In her systematic study of justice Dagmar Herwig showed, as early as 1984, that throughout the history of political philosophy there are irreconcilable conceptions of social and political justice. While egalitarians hold it is just to establish arithmetic, numeric or simple equality, non-egalitarians like Plato, Aristotle or Nietzsche conceive of a just distribution of goods as a distribution in proportion to existing inequalities. For non-egalitarians, it is just to allot equal shares only to equals, not to everyone.

The conference takes as its point of departure the well-researched conviction that there are fundamental disagreements about social and political justice. On the one hand, the conference strives for a more detailed comprehension of the various aspects of the irreconcilable pluralism of conceptions of justice. On the other hand, it investigates the reasons for the fundamental opposition of existing moral intuitions and conceptions of justice. Are these reasons social, cultural, psychological, historical, or even biological? One main focus of the conference will be the relation between conceptions of justice and images of humanity. Do the opposing conceptions of justice derive mainly from opposing anthropological convictions about the equality, or inequality, of men? Do the different understandings of human worth, or value, provide a key to comprehending the fundamental disagreements about social and political justice? In addressing these questions, the conference aims at a more adequate understanding of the concept of justice and the human sense of justice, which can be achieved beyond the idea of the consensus.         

Abstracts of no more than one page for talks and suggestions for panels should be sent to both convenors by March 1, 2013. Decisions will be made within two or three weeks. The length of the talks will depend on how many proposals are accepted, but will be at least 25 minutes. The registration fee of 100 USD covers three lunches and the final conference dinner on a boat on the Bosporus. For students who want to participate in the conference the registration fee is reduced to $ 50.

CONFIRMED INVITED SPEAKERS: Professor Renato Cristi (Wilfrid Laurier University, Canada), Professor Maria Dimitrova (Sofia University, Bulgaria), Professor Giovanni Giorgini (Bologna University, Italy), Louis I. Jaffe Professor Lawrence Hatab (Old Dominion University, Norfolk, USA), Professor Michael Haus (Heidelberg University, Germany), Professor Christoph Horn (Bonn University, Germany), Professor Peter Koller (Graz University, Austria), Professor Angelika Krebs (Basel University, Switzerland), Professor Chandran Kukathas (London School of Economics), Professor Francisco L. Lisi (Carlos III University Madrid), Professor Lukas Meyer (Graz University, Austria), Professor John Skorupski (University of St Andrews, Scotland), Professor Ulrich Steinvorth (Hamburg University), Assist. Prof. Barry Stocker (Istanbul Technical University), Professor Kok-Chor Tan (University of Pennsylvania, USA), Professor Harun Tepe (Hacettepe University, Ankara), Professor John Tomasi (Brown University, Providence, USA), Professor Jonathan Wolff (University College London)

Written by Lucas Thorpe

December 31, 2012 at 3:32 pm

New PhD programme Philosophy (in English), Fatih University, Istanbul

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BREAKING NEWS

Philosophy PhD programme (English) at Fatih University Istanbul approved by Higher Education Board (YÖK)

From the spring term 2013, Fatih University Istanbul is offering a PhD programme in philosophy (taught in English).

For information about the department, see http://felsefe.fatih.edu.tr/?&language=EN

To find out about the areas of specialisation of the faculty, go to http://felsefe.fatih.edu.tr/?staff&language=EN

Informal inquiries to the head of department, Şengül Çelik scelik@fatih.edu.tr and the convening professors Manuel Knoll mknoll@fatih.edu.tr and Marc Rölli marcmroelli@gmail.com

Welcome to Istanbul

Written by rainerbroemer

December 27, 2012 at 10:37 am

Seminar on Human Nature (in Turkish) at BETİM 29 Dec. 2012

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Tarih : 29 Aralık 2012
Yer : Beşikçizade Tıp ve İnsani Bilimler Merkezi (BETİM)

Image

Sempozyum Programı (below the fold)

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Written by rainerbroemer

December 20, 2012 at 11:01 am

Posted in Events in Turkey

Dominic O’Meara on Proclus, Geometry and the Architecture of Hagia Sophia

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As a part of the conference, Arxai: Proclus Diadochus of Constantinople and his Abrahamic Interpreters, Prof. Dominic O’Meara (Université de Fribourg) will present a public lecture entitled, “Geometry as an Image of the Divine in Proclus and in the Architecture of Hagia Sophia”. The lecture will take place on Saturday December 15, 2012, at 8pm at Santa Maria Draperis Church on Istiklaal. (In the direction of Tunel, the church is about 160 m past Galatasaray Lisesi, on the left, down a set of stairs.)

Together with the lecture,  the CorISTAnbul Chamber Choir and Orchestra, featuring Kevork Tavityan, baritone.

For further information about the choir, see http://coristanbul.com/.

About the conference:

The conference as a whole is sponsored by the Consulate General of Greece in Istanbul, the Kingdom of the Netherlands, as a part of the celebration of “400 years of diplomatic relations between the Netherlands and Turkey”, and the Consulate General of Israel in Istanbul. The university sponsors are Fatih University, Bogazici University and Yildiz Technical University. The conference takes place under the auspices of the ISNS.

For further information, see http://arxai.org/conferences/abrahamictrilogy/program and for questions, email David Butorac at davidbutorac@arxai.org.

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Written by davidbutorac

December 14, 2012 at 4:47 pm

Talk at Bogazici: Ralf Bader (Oxford) on “Kant’s Theory of the Highest Good” 21/12/2012

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Ralf Bader (Oxford) will give a talk at Bogazici University on Friday, December 21st, from 5-7pm in TB130.

“Kant’s Theory of the Highest Good”

ABSTRACT: The highest good is the culmination of Kant’s ethical theory. It systematically combines all objects of practical reason, integrating everything that is good into an unconditioned totality. By doing so, it bridges the dualisms between moral and pathological value, between duty and prudence, as well as between virtue and happiness. It thereby gives rise to a unified necessary system of ends. This paper provides a systematic account of Kant’s theory of the highest good, addressing in particular the question why happiness is included in the highest good, why it should be distributed in proportion to virtue, and in what sense the highest good is something that we are meant to bring about.

Ralf Bader received his phd at St Andrews university. He was then a Bersoff Fellow and Assistant Professor/Faculty Fellow of Philosophy at NYU. He is currently a research fellow and University Lecturer at Oxford University. His research primarily focuses on value theory (axiology, intrinsic value, organic unities, agent-relativity, population ethics), contemporary metaphysics (intrinsicality, supervenience, coinciding objects, counterpart theory, dispositions, causation, identity, mereology), and Kant scholarship (highest good, happiness, imperatives, tables of categories, transcendental idealism). He is also interested in neo-Kantian and early analytic philosophy, as well as in political philosophy. Some of his publications can be found here.

Written by Lucas Thorpe

December 14, 2012 at 3:39 pm

TALK: Siyaves Azeri (Queens, Canada) on “Conceptual Cognitive Organs: Toward a Historical Materialist Theory of Scientific Knowledge”, 17/12/2012

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Siyaves Azeri (Queens, Canada) will give a talk at Bogazici on Monday, December 17th from 5-7pm in TB130.

“Conceptual Cognitive Organs: Toward a Historical Materialist Theory of Scientific Knowledge”

ABSTRACT: The relation between scientific concepts and reality cannot be satisfactorily explained unless the empiricist supposition that dramatically differentiates “appearance” and “reality” is dropped. Concepts are components of sign systems, which function as tools of cognitive activity. Conceptual cognition, qualitatively speaking, is not different than perceptual cognition. Concepts are extensions of human sense organs. They are particular higher cognitive organs the function of which is cognitive activity.
Unlike empiricists that locate perception and cognition in human mind, Vygotsky’s historical approach locates perception and cognition outside the psyche or consciousness. It is the degree of abstraction and generalization that differentiates between perceptual and cognitive activities and between different forms of cognition. Scientific concepts and conceptual systems (theories) appear to be a particular form of higher mental activity. They are cognitive tools that provide the ability of systematic cognition of phenomena, which are not available to the grasp of ordinary sense organs. They are tools of scientific “groping” of phenomena. Scientific concepts free perceptual and cognitive activity from determination of “biological” sense organs by providing a high degree of cognitive abstraction and generalization. Scientific cognition, like perceptual activity, is actualized by consciousness but outside the consciousness.

Keywords: Activity, cognition, concept, consciousness, empiricism, reality, science, theory, Vygotsky

Written by Lucas Thorpe

December 13, 2012 at 7:31 pm

Richard Taylor on the Islamic Reception of Proclus

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As a part of the conference, Arxai: Proclus Diadochus of Constantinople and his Abrahamic Interpreters, Prof. Richard Taylor (Marquette University & KU Leuven) will present a lecture entitled, “Proclus Arabus and Divine Primary Causality in the Arabic/Islamic Tradition”. The conference will take place on Friday December 14, 2012, at Bogazici University (South Campus), at 5:30 pm, İbrahim Bodur Oditoryumu.

Abstract:  In this presentation I first provide information on the works of Proclus influential on the Arabic / Islamic philosophical tradition.  As an illustration of that importance, I then turn to the philosophical issue of primary  causality and show the importance of Proclus in the metaphysical thought of al-Kindi and Ibn Sina / Avicenna on the nature of God’s causal influence over all created being.

About Prof Taylor:

He is the chief organizer for the “Aquinas and ‘the Arabs’ International Working Group,” a group of philosophers deeply interested in Arabic / Islamic philosophy in its own right and in its influence on European thought. They are very interested in collaborations with scholars of similar interests throughout the world.  They have annual conferences in Europe (early Summer now usually 2 conferences) and in North America (Fall) but hope soon to expand our connections to North Africa and the wider Middle East. See www.AquinasAndTheArabs.org.

He also organises annual summer conferences on “Philosophy in the Abrahamic Traditions” at the University of Denver and Marquette University in alternate years.

From November 2011-November 2012 he was president of the American Catholic Philosophical Association and had the privilege of naming the conference theme for the November 2012 annual meeting which was on “Philosophy in the Abrahamic Traditions.”

For further information about Prof Taylor see:

http://academic.mu.edu/taylorr/Aquinas_and_the_Arabs/Aquinas_%26_the_Arabs.html

About the conference:

The conference as a whole is sponsored by the Consulate General of Greece in Istanbul, the Kingdom of the Netherlands, as a part of the celebration of “400 years of diplomatic relations between the Netherlands and Turkey”, and the Consulate General of Israel in Istanbul. The university sponsors are Fatih University, Bogazici University and Yildiz Technical University. The conference takes place under the auspices of the ISNS.

For further information, see http://arxai.org/conferences/abrahamictrilogy/program and for questions, email David Butorac at davidbutorac@arxai.org.

Proclus in Istanbul Conference POSTER SMALL

Written by davidbutorac

December 13, 2012 at 12:30 am

Tzvi Langermann on the Jewish reception of Proclus

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As a part of the conference, Arxai: Proclus Diadochus of Constantinople and his Abrahamic Interpreters, Prof. Tzvi Langermann will present a lecture on “Proclus and his Cameo Appearances in Jewish Writings”. The lecture will be held at Bogazici University, on Thursday, Dec 13th, at 5:30, in the Büyük Toplantı Salonu / Albert Long Hall (South Campus).

Tzvi Langermann earned his PhD in History of Science at Harvard. He teaches now at Bar Ilan University, and he publishes widely on science, philosophy, and religious thought in Judaism and Islam. His dissertation, Ibn al-Haytham’s On the Configuration of the World, was later published by Garland. Some of his publications were published in a volume in the Variorum Collected Studies series, entitled The Jews and the Sciences in the Middle Ages(1999). His most recent books are two collections,  Avicenna and his Legacy: A Golden Age of Science and Philosophy, (Brepols, Turnhout, 2010), and Monotheism and Ethics: Historical and Contemporary Intersections between Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, (Brill, 2011; Studies on the Children of Abraham, vol. 2).

Abstract

Only with some generosity can one call Proclus a minor figure in writings connected to the Jewish tradition. In medieval times, only one Proclan text was read, though it was not known that he was the author. Rarely can one argue for a specifically Proclan influence, rather than a more general Neoplatonic one, on a given thinker. The situation changes somewhat much later. In the seventeenth century, much of Proclus was available in Latin, and Greek, and a few Jewish intellectuals made use of them. I will have a look at the man who was most familiar with Proclus, Joseph Solomon Delmedigo, a student of Galileo, who cites Proclus’ commentary to Euclid, his ideas on eternity of the world, and his theory of light.

The conference as a whole is sponsored by the Consulate General of Greece in Istanbul, the Kingdom of the Netherlands, as a part of the celebration of “400 years of diplomatic relations between the Netherlands and Turkey”, and the Consulate General of Israel in Istanbul. The university sponsors are Fatih University, Bogazici University and Yildiz Technical University.

For further questions, email David Butorac at davidbutorac@arxai.org.Image

Written by davidbutorac

December 11, 2012 at 12:22 pm

Prof Stephen Gersh on Proclus’ Christian Reception @ Sismanoglio

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As a part of the conference, Arxai: Proclus Diadochus of Constantinople and his Abrahamic Interpreters, Prof Gersh will give a lecture entitled, “From the One to the Many: the reception of Proclus in the Christian Tradition”. It will be held at Sismanoglio Megaro of the Consulate General of Greece in Istanbul (the one Istiklal), and will begin at 6pm. Wine and snacks will be provided afterwards.

Dr. Gersh was a Fellow of Magdalene College, Cambridge and is currently Professor of Medieval Studies and Concurrent Professor of Philosophy at the University of Notre Dame. He has been Solomon Katz Professor in the Humanities at the University of Washington, Seattle. His books include: Kinesis Akinetos. A Study of Spiritual Motion in the Philosophy of Proclus (1973), From Iamblichus to Eriugena. An Investigation of the Prehistory and Evolution of the Pseudo-Dionysian Tradition (1978), Middle Platonism and Neoplatonism, The Latin Tradition, 2 vols. (1986, Revised Italian edition 2010), Concord in Discourse. Harmonics and Semiotics in Late Ancient and Early Medieval Platonism (1996), Reading Plato, Tracing Plato (2005), Neoplatonism after Derrida (2006), and numerous edited and co-edited volumes dealing with late ancient and medieval philosophy.

The event is generously sponsored by the Greek Consulate  Consulate General of Greece in Istanbul.

The conference as a whole is sponsored by Greek Consulate  Consulate General of Greece in Istanbul, the Kingdom of the Netherlands, as a part of the celebration of “400 years of diplomatic relations between the Netherlands and Turkey”, and the Consulate General of Israel in Istanbul. The university sponsors are Fatih University, Bogazici University and Yildiz Technical University.

For further questions, email David Butorac at davidbutorac@arxai.org.

 

Written by davidbutorac

December 11, 2012 at 11:05 am

Posted in Uncategorized

Talk by Gürol Irzık at Fatih University: From Paradigms to Taxonomic Lexicons – Thomas Kuhn’s Linguistic Turn

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It has been fifty years since Thomas Kuhn’s “Structure of Scientific Revolutions” was first published. On this occasion, the Philosophy Department of Fatih University and Fatih Felsefe Kulübü are happy to host a talk by

Gürol Irzık (Sabancı Üniversitesi)

From Paradigms to Taxonomic Lexicons: Thomas Kuhn’s Linguistic Turn

Date: Wed. 19 December 2012

Time: 2 pm – 3.30 pm

Room: M-226 (opposite library entrance)

The speaker will trace the evolution of Kuhn’s views about  science from *The Structure of Scientific Revolutions* to *The Road  Since Structure*. This evolution can be described in terms of the increasing tendency in Kuhn’s roughly post-1980 writings to emphasize the role played by taxonomic lexicons in particular and language  learning process in general in the characterization of scientific revolutions and incommensurability.

The claim will  be defended that Kuhn’s linguistic turn can be understood best against the background of a Whorfian  conception of language and certain neo-Kantian themes.

How to reach us:

By public transport: Metrobus direction Beylikdüzü/TÜYAP, get off one stop before terminus (Hadımköy), take the blue bus 418 or the yellow (sometimes green or red and white) HT18 towards Hadımköy (ca. 15 min. to Fatih Kampüsü).

By car: leave the TEM at Hadımköy gişeleri, turn right and follow the signs for Fatih Üniversitesi

Written by rainerbroemer

December 10, 2012 at 2:15 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Symposium on Genetically Modified Organisms at Fatih University (in Turkish)

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Program

09.00-10.00 Kayıt İşlemleri/ Registration

10.00-10.20 Açılış Konuşmaları/ Opening Addresses

10.20-10.30 Çay-Kahve Arası

10.30-12.00 Prof. Dr. Sebahattin ÖZCAN
Genetiği Değiştirilmiş Bitkiler ve Tarıma Katkıları/
Genetically Modified Plants and Their Contribution to Agriculture

Doç. Dr. Mustafa ERAYMAN
GDO’ya Toplumun Bakışı Nedir?/
What is Society’s View on GMOs?

Prof. Dr. Dürdane KOLONKAYA
GDO’lu Ürünlerin Toksik Etkileri Nelerdir?/
What are the Toxic Effects of GMO products?

12.00-12.10 Çay-Kahve Arası

12.10-13.00 PANEL

13.00-14.00 Öğle Yemeği Arası

14.00-15.30 Prof. Dr. Hakan YARDIMCI
Türkiye’de GDO Mevzuatı ve Biyogüvenlik Kurulu Çalışmaları/
Situation of GMO in Turkey and Activities of the Biosafety Commission

Yrd. Doç. Dr. Tahir BAYRAÇ
Nanoteknoloji ve Tarım/ Nanotechnology and Agriculture

Dr. Aslı AKYOL

GDO’nun Çocuk Gelişimi Üzerine Etkisi/ Impact of GMO’s on Child Development

15.30-15.40 Çay-Kahve Arası

15.40-16.30 PANEL

16.30-17.00 Kapanış Konuşmaları

17.00-17.30 Sertifika Dağıtımı

for more details, go to

http://www.binotek.org/tr/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=544&Itemid=240

How to reach us:

By public transport: Metrobus direction Beylikdüzü/TÜYAP, get off one stop before terminus (Hadımköy), take the blue bus 418 or the yellow (sometimes green or red and white) HT18 towards Hadımköy (ca. 15 min. to Fatih Kampüsü).

By car: leave the TEM at Hadımköy gişeleri, turn right and follow the signs for Fatih Üniversitesi

Written by rainerbroemer

December 8, 2012 at 2:12 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Arxai: Proclus Diadochus of Constantinople and his Abrahamic Interpreters, Istanbul, December, 12-16, 2012

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Written by rainerbroemer

December 8, 2012 at 1:57 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Richard Taylor at Marmara

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Prof Richard Taylor will give a paper entitled, “Thomas Aquinas’s Debts to the Arabic Philosophical Tradition on Creation, Natural Epistemology and the Supernatural Epistemology of Beatitude”. It will take place at Marmara University, Theology Faculty, Tuesday Dec 11, at 3pm in the Dekanlik Yönetim Kurulu Odasi. For any questions, please contact David Butorac at davidbutorac@arxai.org.

Written by davidbutorac

December 8, 2012 at 10:29 am

Posted in Uncategorized